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Heavy Metal Magazine Covers. 1977

МЕДОВЫЙ МЕСЯЦ by Jacques Tardi // Heavy Metal Magazine. 1977. May – Volume 1 No. 2. From Page 5
МЕДОВЫЙ МЕСЯЦ by Jacques Tardi // Heavy Metal Magazine. 1977. May – Volume 1 No. 2. From Page 5
 
 
 
HEAVY METAL began with a CLANG! No cute and sexy women on those early covers ... just a scary visual version of the logical result of Arthur Clarke’s and Stanley Kubrick’s HAL taking semihuman form. Or were those metallic things really the future us?
 
If you are, by any chance, searching here for a few of those famous HM winged or antennae-bearing cover girls, then you’ll have to be patient. True magic, real monsters, landscapes of incredible beauty, and a unique group of supremely talented artists must be dealt with first.
 
 
 

Heavy Metal. 1977. April – Volume 1 No. 1

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. April – Volume 1 No. 1  Heavy Metal. 1977. April – Volume 1 No. 1
 
 
CONTENTS
p.03 - "Origins"
p.05-12 - "Den" - Richard Corben (reprinted in One Step Beyond 1996)
p.13-15 - "Rut" - Philippe Druillet
p.16-27 - "Conquering Armies" - Jean-Pierre Dionnet and Jean-Claude Gal
p.29-36 - "The Adventures Of Yrris" - Philippe Druillet and Dominique "Alexis" Vallet
p.37-44 - "Arzach" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.45-54 - "Selenia" - Marre and Sergio Macedo
p.55-57, 78 - "The Sword Of Shannara" - Terry Brooks, Tim Hildebrandt, and Greg Hildebrandt
p.59-68 - "Traumwach: A Tale Of Romantic-Kitsch" - Mouchel, Pauline Pierson, and Alain Voss
p.69-76 - "Space Punks" - Jean-Claude Mézières
p.77, 84 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.79-82 - "Age Of Ages: A Gothic Science-Fiction Trip To The Apocalypse" - Norman Rubington and Akbar Del Piombo
p.85-88 - "Sunpot" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.89-92 - "Sunpot: Chapter 1" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.93-96 - "Manipulation" - Roy
Front Cover - Jean-Michel Nicollet
Back Cover - Philippe Druillet
 


 

 
Heavy Metal magazine is the only comic book/magazine in my collection of which I am proud to say that I have each and every issue. I grew up with American comics, but when Heavy Metal hit, it introduced me to other worlds of art, sci-fi, and adventure that I still think, to this day, American comics lack. To me, Heavy Metal is the James Bond of storytelling. We get to see a bit of the world and enjoy some wild sex, gratuitous violence, and other-worldly adventure. And best of all, it's in English.
 
Jimmy Palmiotti
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. May – Volume 1 No. 2

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. May – Volume 1 No. 2  Heavy Metal. 1977. May – Volume 1 No. 2
 
 
CONTENTS
p.03 - "Further..."
p.05-12 - "МЕДОВЫЙ МЕСЯЦ" - Jacques Tardi
p.13-20 - "The Adventures Of Yrris" - Philippe Druillet and Dominique "Alexis" Vallet
p.21-24 - "Sunpot: Chapter 2" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.25-28 - "Sunpot: Chapter 3" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.29-43 - "Agorn" - Philippe Druillet
p.44 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.45-52 - "Den" - Richard Corben (reprinted in One Step Beyond 1996)
p.53-64 - "Conquering Armies" - Jean-Pierre Dionnet and Jean-Claude Gal
p.66-68 - "Age Of Ages: A Gothic Science-Fiction Trip To The Apocalypse" - Norman Rubington and Akbar Del Piombo
p.69-72 - "Roger" - D. Locquet and Souchu
p.74-77 - "Up The Walls Of The World: The Star-Death Of Margaret Omali" - James Tiptree Jr.
p.79-84 - "Virgo" - Philippe "Caza" Cazamayou (reprinted in The Best Of 1982 and Greatest Hits 1994)
p.85-92 - "Harzak" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.93-96 - "Festival" - Philippe Picaret and Baret
Front Cover - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
Back Cover - Philippe Druillet
 


 

 
For us, doing a painting for Heavy Metal is a rare creative thrill. It gives us the freedom to be bold, to step beyond the imposed boundaries of the establishment and enter a world of exciting wickedness. It's like taking a vacation to an extra-terrestrial adult theme park that's bursting with energy, great forbidden fun, and sexy campiness — a place you definitely want to come back to again and again.
 
Boris Vallejo and Julie Bell
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. June – Volume 1 No. 3

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. June – Volume 1 No. 3  Heavy Metal. 1977. June – Volume 1 No. 3
 
 
CONTENTS
p.01 - "Chain Mail"
p.03 - "...Still..."
p.04-11 - "Gail" - Philippe Druillet
p.13-20 - "World Apart: The Golden City" - E. E. Davis
p.21-24 - "Conquering Armies" - Jean-Pierre Dionnet and Jean-Claude Gal
p.25-28 - "The Vessel" - Dominique Hé
p.29-32 - "Sunpot: Chapter 4" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.35-44 - "Rockblitz" - Sergio Macedo
p.45-52 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.55-57 - "Night Images: A Book Of Fantasy Verse: The Heart Of The Sea's Desire" - Robert Ervin Howard, Richard Corben, and Frank Frazetta
p.58-59 - "Night Images: A Book Of Fantasy Verse: A Word From The Outer Dark" - Robert Ervin Howard, Richard Corben, and Frank Frazetta
p.60 - "Night Images: A Book Of Fantasy Verse: The Ghost Kings" - Robert Ervin Howard, Richard Corben, and Frank Frazetta
p.61-68 - "Fear Of The Blue-Eyed Sloane!" - Jacques Tardi
p.69-71 - "Age Of Ages: A Gothic Science-Fiction Trip To The Apocalypse" - Norman Rubington and Akbar Del Piombo
p.73-75 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.77-84 - "Arzak" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.85-88 - "Vengeance" - Dominique "Alexis" Vallet
p.89-96 - "Shells" - François Schuiten and Luc Schuiten (reprinted in Greatest Hits 1994)
Front Cover - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
Back Cover - Philippe Druillet
 


 

 
Heavy Metal represents a global view of comics and illustrators, since many of the artists are from different countries.The magazine offers a unique variety of work. That also makes Heavy Metal a very risky publication because artists offer their most personal works. A good deal of my independent work has appeared on Heavy Metal's covers. They have always been images from the science-fiction and fantasy genres, through which I've tried to provoke a challenge to the observer.
 
Luis Royo
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. July – Volume 1 No. 4

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. July – Volume 1 No. 4
 
 
CONTENTS
p.01 - "Chain Mail"
p.02 - "Harzac" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.05 - "...Yet..."
p.06-11 - "Approaching Centauri" - Philippe Druillet and Jean "Mœbius" Giraud (reprinted in The Best Of 1982)
p.12-19 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.20-21 - "The Prince Of Mist: I. Arrival" - Walter C. F. Perry and Jean-Michel Nicollet
p.21-22 - "The Prince Of Mist: II. Discovery" - Walter C. F. Perry
p.22-23 - "The Prince Of Mist: III. Conception And Creation" - Walter C. F. Perry
p.23 - "The Prince Of Mist: IV. Epilogue" - Walter C. F. Perry
p.25-32 - "World Apart: The Golden City" - E. E. Davis
p.33 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.34-43 - "Nep Simo" - Alain Voss
p.45-52 - "Harzakc" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.53-64 - "Conquering Armies" - Jean-Claude Gal and Jean-Pierre Dionnet
p.65-68 - "Sunpot: Chapter 5" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.69-72 - "Sunpot: Chapter 6" - Vaughn Bodé and Jack Adler (reprinted in 15 Years Of 1992)
p.74-79 - "The Golden Queen: A Border Ballad" - Serge Bihannic and Philippe Druillet
p.80-87 - "The Long Tomorrow" - Dan O'Bannon and Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.88-94 - "Crossroads Of The Universe" - Enki Bilal (reprinted in Greatest Hits 1994)
p.95-96 - "Harzack" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
Cover - "Arzach Rides Again" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
 


 

 
From what I understand of the history of Heavy Metal magazine, the recognition back in the 1970s and 1980s that comic art and some of the mainstream SF and fantasy art was suddenly finding its most innovative and interesting voice in Europe was the catalyst for the advent of this wonderful, cutting-edge publication. It was like nothing else published in the US until then — a totally new glance into a variety of largely dark and fearful futures. While my own work tries to pursue a narrative path governed by the texts that I'm presented with, occasionally that path is of an appropriately less-than-cheerful image of the times to come — which seems to fit in very well with the punkish, gritty ethos of Heavy Metal! It always gave me particular pleasure to know that the magazine wanted one of my images. Helped me to feel highly contemporary and "in touch" with the more interesting and innovative artists of the time. It has certainly played an important part in my career, both as a source of inspiration and of encouragement towards a certain subtle redefining of my style.
 
Jim Burns
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. August – Volume 1 No. 5

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. August – Volume 1 No. 5  Heavy Metal. 1977. August – Volume 1 No. 5
 
 
CONTENTS
p.04 - "...Thus..."
p.05-08 - "The Black Queen" - Marcel Gotlib and Philippe Druillet
p.09-16 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.18-23 - "Fever" - Halmos
p.24-31 - "Roger" - D. Locquet and Souchu
p.32-44 - "Polonius" - Philippe Picaret and Jacques Tardi
p.45-52 - "The Green Hand" - Elisabeth "Zha" Salomon and Nicole Claveloux
p.53-56 - "Age Of Ages: A Gothic Science-Fiction Trip To The Apocalypse" - Norman Rubington and Akbar Del Piombo
p.58-61, 96 - "Space War Blues: Our Own Little Mardi Grass" - Richard Allen Lupoff and George Barr
p.62-64 - "The Coincidence" - Alain Voss
p.65-72 - "The Long Tomorrow: Part 2" - Dan O'Bannon and Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.73-79 - "Hamilton Potemkine" - Philippe Druillet
p.80 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.81-88 - "World Apart: The Golden City" - E. E. Davis
p.89-95 - "Package For You, Missus Jones" - Alex
Front Cover - "Ziegfried" - Berni Wrightson
Back Cover - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
 


 

 
In the charming, wondrous, and incredibly, unexpectedly adult 1964 movie Mary Poppins, one of the principal characters states, "It's a doorway to a land of enchantment." Bert the chimney-sweep (played with a mixture of over-the-top rambunctiousness and much-too-easy-to-miss subtlety by Dick Van Dyke) was speaking of the world that awaits those brave souls who meander "'tween pavement and stars ... up where the smoke is all billowed and curled." But he could have been describing the art that wraps itself around the Beatles' Sergeant Pepper album or the tantalizing anatomical impossibility that appeared on the poster for the movie version of M*A*S*H or the "splash pages" of Will Eisner's disarmingly brilliant Spirit stories ... or any of the Heavy Metal covers that are to be found on the colorful pages of this volume.
 
While it's true that you should never judge a book by its cover, unavoidable reality tells us that a discerning, knowing, and enlightened listener/viewer/reader is often introduced to a whole world of wonders by way of a single, powerful image. You see something unique and beautiful and timeless that beckons to you and asks that you set out on a journey of discovery. Heartened by the image, it's that much easier to throw open the sometimes imposing doorway and to enter that world. I know a lot about such stuff because I was Heavy Metal's "doorman" for seven years, though my official job title was "Art Director."
 
From 1977 to 1984, I had a great time each month putting together the exactly 100 pages of diverse material that made up an issue of Heavy Metal the Adult Illustrated Fantasy Magazine. Each page passed through my hands for a period of time that could be measured in seconds, minutes, hours, or days. I tried to always give the readers their money's worth with each of those pages, never allowing an easy-to-create page to show its simplicity or a time-consuming one to reflect its particular difficulties. For each page, I attempted to make sure that I'd touched all the requisite bases, whether I was dealing with the eccentricities of an advertiser's supplied material or with the problems to be found in a short comics story that I'd both written and drawn. In the end, all were enjoyable, but I'd have to say that the most fun I had in bringing together various visual elements involved the creation of the Heavy Metal covers.
 
John Workman
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. September – Volume 1 No. 6

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. September – Volume 1 No. 6  Heavy Metal. 1977. September – Volume 1 No. 6
 
 
CONTENTS
p.01 - "Chain Mail"
p.01 - "Chain Mail: Illustration" - Jean-Michel Nicollet
p.04 - "...Also..."
p.05-08 - "The Last Vodka on Smirnov" - Patrick Lesueur and "Brother" Alain
p.09-16 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.18 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.19-31 - "The Airtight Garage Of Jerry Cornelius: Major Fatal" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.34-41 - "Teonanacatl: Genese" - Cortman
p.42-44 - "Is There A Demon Lover In The House?" - Roger Zelazny
p.46-53 - "Night Grass" - Nicole Claveloux and Elisabeth "Zha" Salomon
p.54-56 - "AAARRRZZZ" - Philippe Druillet
p.57-64 - "World Apart" - E. E. Davis
p.66-74 - "Polonius" - Philippe Picaret and Jacques Tardi
p.75-82 - "It's A Small Universe" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.83-96 - "Orcyb" - Sergio Macedo
Front Cover - Philippe Druillet
Back Cover - "Major Grubert" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
 


 

 
I wanted to (metaphorically, of course) bash in the heads of potential readers with those covers and to then proceed to shanghai those people as they innocently and unwittingly headed toward their work or to shopping or some other mundane experience. Those unfortunate people may not have realized the truth that looked back from their bathroom mirrors each morning, but they were and are definitely in need of a trip to the unique fantasy world provided by Heavy Metal. Of course, they could always put in an appearance at a worthwhile movie or an inspiring play. They could open the pages of any one of the always-growing number of great books that manage to communicate so much of the painfully-acquired knowledge that real people continue to try to offer us ... about the possibilities of finding some fun while playing out our limited number of days and nights. They can listen to music that is, at the same time, so incredibly powerful and so sadly fragile and also so easily available. No iron-willed king who thundered his wrath at court musicians ever had even the possibility of hearing such a variety of blissful sounds.
 
If they’re really hard up for entertainment (an impossibility, given the near-inexhaustible amount of great stuff to be found all around us), they can play a few video games or complacently stare at the unblinking eye of a TV set.
 
But if they do any of those things, they'll still be left without their absolutely necessary drink of the life-affirming tonic that only Heavy Metal can provide. You see, the inside of each issue of Heavy Metal is one of the few remaining places where a reader can find tales of fantasy and romance and adventure that are told in a unique language that combines words and pictures into a single, powerful unit. And yes, I know that movies and television, whether animated or "live," can claim to do the same thing, but the differences between filmed entertainment and what has come to be known as "comics" far outnumber any similarities. You can start with the fact that, while even the least expensive movie is a collaborative effort making use of the abilities of numerous people, one guy with a pen and a bottle of ink can put a cast of thousands through their paces in a story told in comics form. Aside from the obvious personal aspects of the form, there are so many elements ... dealing with individual page design, pacing, narration, dialogue, exaggerating for effect, what to leave out, what to leave in ... that work perfectly within a comics story, but would call attention to themselves as being odd or even ludicrous in a film.
 
And yes, I also know that there are other outlets for the comics form in the US of A. But those often unreadable, sometimes magnificent examples of what comic books have come to have been rapidly fading from view over the last two decades. For the average person (who, aware of it or not, remains a potential reader), the once-ubiquitous comic book is nearly impossible to find. If a miracle should somehow occur and the comics-starved reader is suddenly compelled to make the often hundreds of miles trek in order to find one of the handful of remaining "comics shops," what happens next? In order to ferret out something worthwhile, the poor soul will be forced to sift through far too many examples of incomprehensible junk that are of no interest to anyone outside of the small, in-bred "fan" group that has succeeded in hiding comics away from the much larger number of people who used to read them.
 
You don't need to go through all that unnerving silliness to find and appreciate Heavy Metal. The dull and feeble doorway that regular comic books offer is usually hidden by what amounts to timid acquiescence to the unchallenged "realities" of the art/business of comics publishing. In contrast, the doorway that is a Heavy Metal cover shines like a beacon. It can be found in the few "comic shops," but it's also on general newsstands and in regular bookstores. You can even subscribe and have it delivered to your own home. There will certainly be those who may, after walking through HM's doorway, find a few of the stories not to their liking. At least they won't be confronted by the embarrassing spectacle of the oxymoronic "adult" superhero comics story that chronicles the pathetically childish doings of a muscular fellow arrayed in colorful tights who manages to bore the reader to death with his interminable attempts to cope with middle-age angst. The divergent characters, stories, and art styles found in Heavy Metal may sometimes leave the reader pondering the meaning of what he's just read. Some of those works may produce awe, wonder, and plenty of questions, but they will never bore the reader.
 
John Workman
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. October – Volume 1 No. 7

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. October – Volume 1 No. 7  Heavy Metal. 1977. October – Volume 1 No. 7
 
 
CONTENTS
p.01 - "Chain Mail"
p.01 - "Chain Mail: Illustration" - Alain Voss
p.04 - "...And..."
p.05-06 - "The Airtight Garage Of Jerry Cornelius: Chapter One: A Dangerous Overhaul" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.07-16 - "How Good Is Man?" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.18-20 - "The Singsong Of Cecily Snow" - Theodore Sturgeon and Chris Callis
p.21-25 - "Jet Man" - Angus McKie (reprinted in The Best Of 1982)
p.28-29 - "Le Garage: Chapter Two: Alert On The Tundra" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.30-44 - "Turod: The Last Knight Of The Age: The Palace Of The Sorcerers" - Phil Rosilio and Iso Kahn
p.45-52 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.53-64 - "Diabolical Planet: Opération Omega: A Space Adventure" - Maurice Leblanc and Denis Sire
p.66-74 - "Jean Cyriaque: In You I Am Reborn" - Jean-Pierre Dionnet and Jean Solé
p.76-77 - "The Airtight Garage Of Jerry Cornelius: Chapter Three: The Plot Thickens" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.78-85 - "White Night" - Elisabeth "Zha" Salomon and Nicole Claveloux (reprinted in The Best Of 1982)
p.86-96 - "Polonius" - Philippe Picaret and Jacques Tardi
Front Cover - Jean-Michel Nicollet
Back Cover - Berni Wrightson
 


 

 
There are a couple of things that I came to comprehend while revisiting over two decades of cover artwork. The first involved the back covers that adorned every issue of the magazine until some time in 1985. Those secondary covers served a purpose and were an important extra for the Heavy Metal readers. Several of the back covers (and I won't reveal which) were originally scheduled to be front covers, but were "demoted" because they didn't have the appeal that the "doorway" art needed. Still, the back covers are all exquisite pieces of art that deserved to be shown, each issue, in a special place. I miss 'em. You should, too.
 
The second epiphany involves the UPC box. That's the ugly little piece of scanner doggerel that appears at the bottom of each cover. I hate that lousy thing. It's defaced pieces of great art to a degree that puts to shame the combined rampages of all the looters, barbarians, and bowdlerizing morons who ever lived. Just look at what was done to the overwhelmingly beautiful cover that's on the bottom of page 107. Yeah, the UPC could have been moved over to the right side, but some timid person probably took too seriously the pronouncements of a mushbrained bureaucrat who ordained that the godawful box be placed exactly where it is. Complain about such atrocities, people. Loudly. I've got faith in you. You can change things for the better.
 
John Workman
 
Heavy Metal : 25 years of classic covers / compiled, designed and written by John Workman. — New York : Metal Mammoth, Inc., 2002.
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. November – Volume 1 No. 8

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. November – Volume 1 No. 8  Heavy Metal. 1977. November – Volume 1 No. 8
 
 
CONTENTS
p.04 - "...Nonetheless..."
p.05-08 - "The Airtight Garage Of Jerry C.: The Third Trick: Star Billiard" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.09-16 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.17-26 - "Bird Dust" - Philippe "Caza" Cazamayou and François Bazzoli (reprinted in January 1984)
p.27-32 - "A Visit To Jivaskilla Technexpo" - Patrick Lesueur
p.33-40 - "Blue Terror" - Elisabeth "Zha" Salomon and Nicole Claveloux
p.41-44 - "The Adventures Of Ludwig Mollusc: The Feet Upon The Stomach" - Richard "F'Murr" Peyzaret
p.45-53 - "Ballade" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud and Arthur Rimbaud (reprinted in The Best Of 1982)
p.54 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
p.56-63 - "World Apart: The Golden City" - E. E. Davis
p.64-69 - "How's The Night Life On Cissalda?" - Harlan Ellison and Tom Barber
p.69-70 - "Chain Mail"
p.73-81 - "Polonius" - Philippe Picaret and Jacques Tardi
p.83-90 - "Master" - Jean-Michel Nicollet (reprinted in The Best Of 1982 and Greatest Hits 1994)
p.92-96 - "1996" - Chantal Montellier
Front Cover - George Proctor
Back Cover - Tom Barber
 


 

 

Heavy Metal. 1977. December – Volume 1 No. 9

 
Heavy Metal. 1977. December – Volume 1 No. 9  Heavy Metal. 1977. December – Volume 1 No. 9
 
 
CONTENTS
p.04 - "...Regardless..."
p.07-14 - "Den" - Richard Corben
p.15-22 - "Vuzz: Chapter 1" - Philippe Druillet
p.23-27 - "Vuzz: Chapter 2" - Philippe Druillet
p.28-32 - "Vuzz: Chapter 3" - Philippe Druillet
p.33-38 - "Vuzz: Chapter 4" - Philippe Druillet
p.39-46 - "Telefield" - Sergio Macedo
p.48-50 - "Close Encounters Of The Third Kind: Chapter Eleven" - Steven Spielberg
p.52-55 - "Fortune's Fool!" - Howard Chaykin and Leonard Wein
p.57-64 - "The Mauve Sideshow" - Elisabeth "Zha" Salomon and Nicole Claveloux
p.66-67 - "Black Thursday" - Jean "Mœbius" Giraud
p.69-75 - "Vuzz: Chapter 5" - Philippe Druillet
p.76-80 - "Vuzz: Chapter 6" - Philippe Druillet
p.81-83 - "Vuzz: Chapter 7" - Philippe Druillet
p.84-88 - "Vuzz: Chapter 8" - Philippe Druillet
p.89-104 - "Vuzz: Chapter 9" - Philippe Druillet
Front Cover - Jean Solé
Back Cover - Howard Chaykin
 


 

 
 
Heavy Metal is an American science fiction and fantasy comics magazine, published beginning in 1977. The magazine is known primarily for its blend of dark fantasy/science fiction and erotica and steampunk comics.
 
Unlike the traditional American comic books of that time bound by the restrictive Comics Code Authority, Heavy Metal featured explicit content. The magazine started out as a licensed translation of the French science-fantasy magazine Métal hurlant, including work by Enki Bilal, Philippe Caza, Guido Crepax, Philippe Druillet, Jean-Claude Forest, Jean Giraud (a.k.a. Moebius), Chantal Montellier, and Milo Manara. The magazine later ran Stefano Tamburini and Tanino Liberatore's ultra-violent RanXerox. Heavy Metal gradually evolved into a publication featuring North American contributors like Richard Corben, Matt Howarth, Stephen R. Bissette, Alex Ebel, John Holmstrom, Paul Kirchner, Terrance Lindall, Gray Morrow, Walt Simonson, Dan Steffan, Jim Steranko, John Shirley, Arthur Suydam, Bernie Wrightson, and Olivia De Berardinis.
 
As cartoonist/publisher Kevin Eastman saw it, Heavy Metal published European art which had not been previously seen in the United States, as well as demonstrating an underground comix sensibility that nonetheless "wasn't as harsh or extreme as some of the underground comix – but . . . definitely intended for an older readership."
 
After running as a monthly for its first nine years, in the winter of 1986 Heavy Metal dropped to a quarterly schedule, continuing until March 1989, when it switched to a bi-monthly schedule. HM Communications published 136 issues in 16 volumes from April 1977 to March 1992.
 
 
 
Heavy Metal («Тяжёлый металл») — американский журнал для взрослой аудитории, публикующий комиксы и рассказы в жанрах фэнтези и научной фантастики. Начав выходить в апреле 1977 года, публиковал переведённые с французского языка работы художников Энки Билала, Жана Жиро (известного как Mœbius), Philippe Druillet, Milo Manara и Philippe Caza, опубликованные до этого в журнале Métal Hurlant, издававшийся с декабря 1974 года во Франции.
 
 

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